Posts tagged ‘Visual Arts’

February 13, 2012

Makeover Monday::Painting Studio Organizing

by heatherkp

Today is the first Monday I will feature before and after images of recent organizing projects.  I was excited to begin working with this artist and be able to help get this beautiful new home studio space set up!

The project encompassed mainly sorting items into categories for usage and designating spaces for each.  I also assisted with placing furniture and other items for use and Inspiration around the studio.  To give you an idea of time needed for this type of project, I worked mainly alone (due to this clients health condition) for about 6 hours to complete the space.

Studio Entrance Before (left) and After (right)

Sink Area Before (left) and After (right)

Studio Looking In Before (left) and After (right)

Studio Opposite View Before (left) and After (right)

This artist now has ample room, light and a well thought out space where each item is closely stored in zones created based upon their designated use.  For example the paints and paint brushes are near the palettes and easels, the drawing tools are near the drawing table, the frames are stored in an out of the way area and there are two comfortable chairs set up for reading (with books nearby for inspiration and research), placing models and sitting back to evaluate ongoing work.  I’ve suggested a couple small projects that will allow for better storage of certain items in the space (paper bins and an area for hanging extra frames).  As I always do with my clients, I will follow up several times to be sure that the space and placement of items is working well and if needed we will make adjustments so the client will be able to maintain a certain level of organization on their own.

Working with artists is a particular passion of mine.  I am so excited for this artist to begin to work in this new space and allow the creative process to flow unhindered by clutter!

September 7, 2011

At Work in the Studio With::Penland Artists

by heatherkp

For quite some time now I’ve been contemplating how to merge my love of art and design and my passion for organization.  While I was away at Penland I found a little seed that’s germinated and has been pushing it’s way slowly to the surface.  In that wonderful nurturing and creative environment I spent a lot of time walking around and observing other artists, their “studio” (albeit temporary for most) spaces and the work being created.  One particular evening we were visiting the Resident artists studio’s and the idea really struck me to start a blog interview series with artists about their sense of or lack of organizational skills and how that affects their work.

Above and Below::Studio space of Jewelry Artist Jeong Ju Lee

Above and Below::Studio space of Daniel Marinelli

Below::Studio space of Textile Artist and Weaver Robin Johnston

Today I’m bringing you the introduction to this new series.  I can’t promise how frequently I will be doing interviews, much of that depends upon who I’ve come across and their willingness to share their organization or lack of.  For many artists and creative types being organized is just not a big priority and often staying organized is a struggle.  Revealing this to the world may not be something many artists are willing to share.   So many people continue to feel embarassed or asshamed about being disorganized but I am here to say that EVERYONE struggles with organization in some area of their life (or has in the past).

Above and Below::Studio space and workshop of Woodworker Tom Shields

Upon speaking with many artists though I’ve come to realize that for all of us there is a cycle to the way we work.  We carve out a space, gather the materials we think we might need to begin and we dig in.  For some creators they need to end each work day (or session) with a bit of re-organizing and tidying up.  Others will continue to work right along side the ever growing piles of detritus, materials, abandoned projects, dishes, tools and whatever else accumulates.   Some artists can go days, weeks or months before they feel the need to stop and tidy up again.  What prompts this action?  Is it the completion of a big project or a feeling of distraction or getting stuck?

Above and Below:: Iron Forging workshop

Above and Below:: Woodworking workshop and workbenches of student artists

I wonder for each of us, how does the order or chaos of our working environment impact the artwork we create?  When you look at someone’s artwork is there any clue as to their working methods?  Could you venture to guess if they are organized or dis-organized?  How does our environment help or hinder our creations as artists?  These are all questions I am interested in exploring further as we meet other artists and discuss their working methods, see behind the scenes into their working spaces and perhaps learn some organizing tips from some of them.

Above and Below:: Metal Casting studio workbenches of student artists and the instructor

Above and Below::Studio workspace of Bookmaking student artists

Above and Below::Studio work spaces of Letterpress student artists

Above and Below:: Studio work spaces of Encaustic student artists and instructor

As I wandered from studio to studio observing and speaking with artists about how they work and taking photographs I found that most of the time people tried to tidy up when I asked if I could photograph them and or their spaces.  “No” I said, I want to capture you the way you really work.  I really appreciate the willingness of all these artist to allow me to share their working spaces with you here.

Above:: studio workspace of fellow surface design artist Kathleen Bennett Bastis

Call to action::If you are an artist and feel you are particularly organized or dis-organized and want to share your working practices and space I’d love you to comment here or email me.

Above:: studio work space of my instructor Jason Pollen;>)

January 14, 2011

Field Trip Friday::Corcoran

by heatherkp

I recently went to the Corcoran for a lecture and while I was there I spent a bit of time browsing the exhibits.  I was particularly engaged by the work of the Spencer Fitch exhibit My Business with the Clouds.

This exhibit explores sculpture, photography, paintings and drawings that examine the relationships between science, nature and memory. More specifically he is exploring clouds through weather patterns, light and the environment.  I find it playful, exploratory and curiously observational. This exhibit closes on January 23rd so get there to see it yourself while you can.

Another contemporary exhibit currently underway is Washington Color and Light.  This exhibit showcases pieces by students and contemporaries of the Washington Color School.  These works explore abstraction from the 1950’s-70 in the regional DC area.

While your at the Corcoran you may want to take a little time to explore the permanent exhibits which include incredible contemporary, decorative, European and American art as well as photography.  A few of my favorite pieces are below.

I have tremendous respect for the Corcoran.  I attended summer art classes in sculpture there years ago and I’ve attend regular lectures and film screenings there over the years.  In a city with so many free museums it must be difficult to compete but they seem to engage with the Artist community in a way that other area museums do not.  Perhaps this is due to their commitment to arts education.

Do you have any local museums that do a particularly great job by offering engaging work, education and lectures?  If so I do hope you support them regularly.

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